Ships that pass

Head Over Heels (A4 mixed media with collage 2017)

This isn’t a blog about my life but some background is necessary to this, I feel.

When I was a teenager I was in love most of the time. I nourished myself on a rich diet of Romantic poetry – Keats, Shelley, Coleridge, those boys – and Pre-Raphaelite painting (lots of women staring wistfully at pomegranates). Teenage girls, it seemed, allowed you just enough of themselves to break your adolescent heart, or they were aloof, hanging out with the cool boys.

One reasonably constant object of my teenage desires was Veronique Smith*. Her exotic name – French mother and English father perhaps ? – was only the start of it. She played the violin, she read poetry, she was shy in a way that only self-assured people can affect, she knew about things I didn’t comprehend, she drank red wine.

Veronique and I would often meet at parties. When she walked towards me the angels sang and surrounded us with clouds of joy. We’d talk about this and that. I would look her in the eye to try and keep her engaged or watch her beautiful lips moving as she spoke. I was conscious of the imperfections of my skin and wished I’d worn something different. All too soon she moved on and left with one of the cool boys while the angels wept tears of frustration.

Life went on, I moved to London, and then, during a visit ‘home’ before I left England for a twenty year spell in Europe, I bumped into a mutual friend of mine and Veronique’s from those earlier years. I asked how she was. Married and expecting her second child, said the friend. Of course, she was never meant to be alone for more than a few moments at a time.

A mischievous look came into the eyes of our mutual friend. “You know something,” she said, “Veronique had such a thing about you. She thought you were adorable – but you never asked her out.” Clouds covered the sun, leaves fell from the summer trees, the angels stared at each other and shrugged their heavenly shoulders.

So here’s the love boy, head over heels for the object of his teenage passion, scattering pieces of his heart around him as he turns in confusion and indecision. If only I could reach back down the years and give my younger self some fatherly advice. Follow your heart, I’d tell him: it may not always lead you where you want to go, it may not always be the best choice for you or those around you, but at least you’ll live your life to the full and it’ll rarely be dull – it’ll ring to a glorious music that you’ll never forget.

Veronique Smith wasn’t her real name, of course.*

 

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9 thoughts on “Ships that pass

  1. Beautiful, Michael. My Veronique was Fionnualla. Real name. Carting around that load gets too heavy for us – it’s good to have a way to transform it.

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  2. Dear Michael, Your blog came soon after the review. Many thanks for sending it! I absolutely love your text – you ARE a professional writer; I hope you realize that! If I may make a critical comment: I suppose the contrast between “Véronique” and yourself was what you wanted – but she looks too much like a fashion model from the first half of the 20th century; amazingly well-done, but of a wholly different generation than the boy in love. I hope you will forgive me? Yours ever, Bálint

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    • ‘Veronique’ is actually collaged: she is a woman from a 1970s Vogue dress pattern that I discovered while clearing my Mother’s house, so approximately the right era. I think it’s probably the contrast between the stylised fashion drawing and my drawings that give a disjointed feeling but that, as you point out, was the intention! Thank you as always for your kindness, Bálint.

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